Information on the worlds tallest Skyscrapers including Burj Khalifa, Taipei 101, and many more


Tallest Skyscrapers

 Tallest Skyscrapers Tallest Skyscrapers



This site is a showcase for the Tallest Skyscrapers and buildings in the world. The word skyscraper was first applied to such buildings in the late 19th century, reflecting public amazement at the tall buildings being built in New York City.

#1 - Burj Khalifa in Dubai 828m/2716ft, 162 Floors
#2 -
Makkah Royal Clock Tower Hotel
#3 - Taipei 101 in Taipei 509m/1671ft, 101 Floors
#4 - Shanghai World Financial Center 492m/1614ft
#5 - International Commerce Center,484m/1588ft
#6 - Petronas Towers 1+2 452m/1483ft

The structural definition of the word skyscraper was refined later by architectural historians, based on engineering developments of the 1880s that had enabled construction of tall multi-story buildings. This definition was based on the steel skeleton—as opposed to constructions of load-bearing masonry, which passed their practical limit in 1891 with Chicago's Monadnock Building. Although Philadelphia's City Hall, completed in 1901, is the world's tallest load-bearing masonry structure - a title to which it still holds claim.

The steel frame developed in stages of increasing self-sufficiency, with several buildings in New York and Chicago advancing the technology that allowed the steel frame to carry a building on its own.

Today, however, many of the tallest skyscrapers are built more or less entirely with reinforced concrete. In the United States today, it is a loose convention to draw the lower limit on what is a skyscraper at 150 metres. Elsewhere, though, a shorter building will sometimes be referred to as a skyscraper, especially if it is said to "dominate" its surroundings. Thus, calling a building a skyscraper will usually, but not always, imply pride and achievement.

More and more skyscrapers, towers and buildings are being built in China and East Asia as there population grows and the race for every city to have more impressive space and buildings takes off.


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